“The iPod might not help me cross the street, but going home and listening to the musical content makes me happy and keeps me going."

At 26 years old, Everett Dixon had a massive stroke. He woke one morning to find that he was unable to move his right side. Considered a genetically caused stroke, the specific cause was Sickle Cell Anemia. The stroke had affected not only movement, but also his ability to speak and to remember names.

When Everett left the hospital, he was transferred to Beth Abraham Health Services to focus on his rehabilitation. While at Beth Abraham, he joined the Well–Tuned: Music Players for Health Program.

“With music, you can reach out and connect with other people. Everyone has something that connects him to something else. I’m thinking, I can move my leg and Bob Marley says, ‘don’t give up, no matter how hard, no matter how it looks, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.’”

Everett reports that his memory is working better. He remembers more about how things used to be, and is grateful to everyone who helped him through these last few years…and the music.

“The iPod might not help me cross the street, but going home and listening to the musical content makes me happy and keeps me going. You have to fight for what you want. I’m not there yet, but I’m getting somewhere.”

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